Tuesday

Site Introduction

Welcome to my Photo Gallery. As of October 2019 there are more than 1,653 posts and counting, most containing multiple pictures. I estimate that there are now more than 7,500 pictures on a wide variety of subjects scattered throughout the site that have received more than 444,240 page views. Because most of the pictures shown here have been captured while hiking areas in and around Las Vegas and the surrounding areas, the site has somewhat evolved into more of a hiking journal; listing and describing the places I have visited. There are eight ways to find information on the site. [1] To locate a page on a specific place or subject by using the SEARCH THIS BLOG box located in the upper left side of the home page. One of the easiest ways to find a particular hiking location is to use one of the "TABS" located at the top of each page. For additional ways to locate specific pages ... {click "Read more >>" below}

Sunday

Recently Added Pages

November 2019 Posts (by Category & Title)
NEW - Gold Butte - Whitney Pockets and Arizona Road

October 2019 Posts (by Category & Title)
NEW - Death Valley - Inyo Mine Camp at Death Valley
NEW - Bellagio Conservatory - Bellagio's Conservatory Botanical Garden - Fall Exhibit
NEW - Oatman - Oatman Arizona - Trip Notes for 10/10/2019

September 2019 Posts (by Category & Title)
NEW - Oatman - Oatman Arizona - Summary Page
NEW - Laughlin - Labyrinths in Laughlin NV
   
Click here to see a list of site maintenance actions ... Notes on Recent Site Maintenance                  
Click the "Read more" link below to view a list of 2016-2018 Year-to-Date posts ... 
Click here to view an index of ALL HIKES Listed by Previous Year and Month ...                          Click here to view an index of ALL HIKES listed by LOCATION: Daytrips & Hike Index

Note: Every attempt is made to provide accurate information on the posts made on this site, but occasionally depictions may be inaccurate due to error of available information at the time of posting, mapping, navigation or cataloging. The information on this site is provided without any warranty, express or implied, and is intended for informational and historical purposes only. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

If you have any comments regarding any of these postings, or if you would like to be placed on my mailing list, click here for contact information ... Contact Me.

Daytrip - Inyo Mine Camp at Death Valley Park

Click to Enlarge
On 10/17/2019 Jim Herring, Bob Croke, Ron Ziance and I drove to Death Valley to look for the Inyo Mine Camp. It should be noted that the mine camp and mines are not actually within the boundary of the Death Valley National Park. After thoroughly enjoying the ride through the Echo Canyon, we spent several hours roaming around and taking pictures of the Inyo Mine Camp. Even though many of its buildings are slowly deteriorating due to the natural elements of high winds and hot temperatures, it still has much to see and explore. It is truly a ghost town and mine. Click here for pictures and a description of this trip ... Inyo Mine Camp - Death Valley.

Wednesday

Daytrip - Bellagio’s Conservatory & Botanical Garden – 2019 Autumn Display

Click to Enlarge
This Fall the Bellagio’s Conservatory & Botanical Garden's display celebrates the beauty and wondrous culture of India with golden leaves, soothing waterfalls and, for the first time, two 14-foot exotic elephants. The display, called, The "Indian Summer". This display brings to life India’s culture, folklore and festivities through floral and botanical art. The captivating exhibit is Open through November 30, and is a striking departure from previous displays at Bellagio. It is absolutely a captivating exhibit and should not be missed. Click here for pictures and a description of this exhibit ... Bellagio's Conservatory Botanical Garden - 2019 Autumn Exhibit.

Saturday

Daytrip - Oatman Arizona - A Follow Up

Click to Enlarge
On 10/10/2019 Jim herring and I went back to Oakman with Bob Croke and Ron Ziance, neither of whom had ever been there before. The main purpose of this visit was to spend more time exploring its mine sites and try to gather more pictures and information about them. Here are some of the pictures we got and details we gathered. Check it out here ... Oatman Arizona - Trip Notes for 10/10/2019.

Tuesday

Daytrip - Oatman Arizona

Click to Enlarge
On 09/12/19 Jim Herring and I took a trip to Oatman Arizona via the Labyrinths in Laughlin NV. Click here to view their page ... Labyrinths in Laughlin-NV. We were not overly impressed by the labyrinths in Laughlin, but really enjoyed Oakman. Click here for the page on Oatman, Arizona ... Oatman Arizona. Even though we tried to visit some of the old gold mines, there was more to explore. I am planning on another trip in the near future.

Monday

Daytrip - Pioche Nevada

This was probably my sixth visit to the area of Pioche. Today, Bob Croke, Jim Herring, Ron Ziance and I made the trip to visit our old friend Harvey Smith. It was just to visit with Harvey and have lunch. Click her for pictures and a description of this visit ... Pioche Nevada - 08/20/2019 Trip Notes. On the way home we made a trip stop at the Cathedral Gorge State Park. Click here for pictures and a description ... Cathedral Gorge State Park - 08/20/2019Trip Notes.

Wednesday

Daytrip - Mary Jane Falls Hike

Click to Enlarge
On 08/12/2019 four of us attempted this hike of Mary Jane Falls; Bob Croke, Jim Herring, Ron Ziance and myself. Bob and I had hiked it before, but it was a new experience for Jim and Ron. This 3.2 round trip hike climbs up nearly 1,000 feet. As a result, it is quite strenuous, and due to washed out areas of the trail, it is dangerous at times. The whole trail provides outstanding views of Charleston Peak and the surrounding mountains. Click here for pictures and a description of this hike ... Mary Jane Falls - 08/12/2019 Trip Notes.

Thursday

Daytrip - Bird Spring Petroglyphs

Click to Enlarge
On 6 August, Robert Croke, Jim Herring and Ron Ziance and I drove south of the Bird Spring Range in search of some petroglyphs. Using a map that I had received several years ago from Kathy Pool, we were able to find them without too much difficulty. Click here for pictures and a description of this trip ... Bird Spring Petroglyphs.

Saturday

Daytrip - Cathedral Rock at Mt. Charleston

This was my third hike attempt of Cathedral Rock. This was the last day of Christina's two week visit. It was a beautiful sunny day with a relatively strong breeze that made it 15 degrees cooler than in the city. It was in the mid 80's vice the 100 plus degrees in the city. Today I only hiked half of the trail, while Jim and Christina hike all the way to the top. Click here for pictures and a description of this hike ... Cathedral Rock Hike at Mt. Charleston - 07/30/2019 Hike Notes.

Tuesday

Daytrip - Shooting Gallery Game Drive District

Click to Enlarge
This petroglyph site is situated on the east flank of Badger Mountain, west of Alamo Nevada and is an archaeological district rich in prehistoric rock art, hunting sites, and campsites. Studies of the area have shown that it was used as far back as 6,000 years ago, but, most intensively visited during the past 3,000 years, the site provides evidence that small groups of related households visited the area to hunt, gather wild plants, and to create rock art. The diversity of the rock art found in this area is amazing. As a matter of fact, the Shooting Gallery contains one of the largest concentrations of bighorn sheep figures in southeastern Nevada. Click here for pictures and a description of the site ... Shooting Gallery Game Drive District.

Wednesday

Daytrip - Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge


Click to Enlarge
On 06/27/2019 Jim Herring and I visited the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge and its Black Canyon Petroglyph Area. In addition, we drove the Old Buckhorne Road, sometimes labeled the Black Canyon Road, to the intersection of Alamo Canyon Road, in search of some petroglyphs. We stopped at the visitor center to gather some info, but it was closed. Click here for pictures and description of this trip ... Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge - 06/27/2019 Trip Notes.

Sunday

Daytrip - Carrara Quarry & Fluorspar Canyon

On 06/19/2019 Jim Herring. Bob Croke, Ron Ziance and I drove to Beatty Nevada to visit the Ghost town of Carrara and Fluorspar Canyon. At the Carrara site we drove up to the old marble quarry. It was a very rough road, but we eventually reached the quarry site. We then drove to Fluorspar Canyon, an area that is dotted with dozens of old mines, adits, and open pit mines. We also saw nearly a dozen wild burros while hiking around. Click here for pictures and a description of these sites ... Ghost Town of Carrara - Summary Page and Flurospar Canyon - 06/19/2019 - Trip Notes.

Monday

Daytrip - Kyle Canyon Slots

Click to Enlarge
On 06/03/2019 Jim Herring and I drove to Mt Charleston visiting some of the spots along Kyle Canyon Road. Though we explored several dirt road that branched off Kyle Canyon Road, the main objective of this trip was to visit the Kyle Canyon Slots. Though this was my third visit here, it was Jim's first visit and he enjoyed it. Click here fir pictures and a description of this hike ... Kyle Canyon Slots - Summary Page.

Friday

Daytrip - Mineral Park Ghost Town

Click to Enlarge
On 05/30/2019, Jim Herring and I visited here and hiked the area looking for old mines and ruins. Mineral Park is now a ghost town that was once a mining town in the Mineral Park valley of the Cerbat Mountains in Mohave County, Arizona. The Mineral Park mine is a large open pit copper mine located near the base of the Cerbat Mountains 14 miles northwest of Kingman, Arizona. Mining in the area began in 1871 and a camp was established soon after. It closed for the last time in 1912. As of today, much of the remaining few ruins and foundations, including the town's cemetery, remain within the property of the new (open pit) mine that was started in 1963.  In December 2014 the mine closed as the company filed for bankruptcy. Click here to see pictures and learn about this trip ... Mineral Park Ghost Town & Mines.

Saturday

Daytrip - Bitterspring Road and Spring

Click to Enlarge
On 05/23/2019, joined by another jeep, 6 of us drove up Bittersprings Road to the Bitter Spring. Bittersprings Road is a 6.4-mile backcountry road that runs north from Northshore Road to Bitter Spring, then continues northeast following Echo Wash back to Northshore Road. Bittersprings Road provides access to Bitter Spring Backcountry Byway that travels west to Buffington Pockets. From the pavement, the graded road runs northeast and then north as it descends gently through rolling hills. Though our goal was to drive Bitter Spring Backcountry Byway, we never made it. For pictures and a description of this trip, click here ... Bittersprings Road

Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge - 06/27/2019 Trip Notes

{Click on any image to view full size, then use the back button on your browser to return to this page}
This page last updated on 06/27/2019
(Fig. 01)
06/27/2019 Trip Notes: Today, Jim Herring and I visited the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge and its Black Canyon Petroglyph Area. In addition, we drove the Old Buckhorne Road, sometimes labeled the Black Canyon Road, to the intersection of Alamo Canyon Road, in search of some petroglyphs. We stopped at the visitor center to gather some info, but it was closed. Before attempting Old Buckhorne road (Fig. 01), we drove beyond the visitor center to the old "Petroglyph Cabin" (Fig. 02).
Side Note on the "Petroglyph Cabin": There is nothing known about this unique building, built on the edge of a sparsely populated desert valley, a distance from either of the east or west roads that ran the length of the valley. The beveled doorway opening and decorative course of rock crowning the building are the possible signs of a commercial building. The window frames were shaped with hand tools and joined with unique triangular notching. Its large fireplace and imposing chimney were used for cooking and for heat. Inside there is a loft that could have been used to store supplies and hold things from the wooden planks that support it. It was probably built in the 1870s., but all of these things is really unknown. It was restored in 2009 to its original appearance. 
(Fig. 02)
We then hiked the area of the Black Canyon. My last visit here was in 2015. When I hiked the Black Canyon, I was informed that it was off limits to the general public for now, but that there were plans to construct a parking area, trails, rest areas, interpretive signs, and barriers designed to protect cultural and archeological resources. Today I was amazed at the result. There are trails around the area that lead to vantage points where you can view some of the better known petroglyphs (Fig. 03). They have also planted many trees and shrubs, altered and cleaned up the waterways and directed the flow of water through the canyon (Fig. 04). Because I have many pictures from previous visits, I didn't take any pictures of petroglyphs. Refer to the following pages ... Black Canyon Petroglyphs - Summary Page. We then started driving out on Old Buckhorne Road that is adjacent to the Black Canyon parking area. The view in (Fig. 01) is about a couple of miles out. We were amazed about the quality of this dirt road. Unfortunately, we didn't notice any petroglyphs on any of the boulders surrounding the sides of the road. About 6-7 miles out we came to a road that led us to the Alamo Canyon Road. We turned west and headed back to route 93. Refer to the map in (Fig. 05). Again, the quality of this road as it snaked its way through the Hiko Range was surprising. We were surrounded on all sides by views of the cliffs and mountains. Other than a pleasant ride through the mountains we didn't find anything. This is the only sign of life we saw all day (Fig. 06).

(Fig. 03)
(Fig. 04)
(Fig. 05)
(Fig. 06)

___________________________________________________

Note: Every attempt is made to provide accurate information, but occasionally depictions are inaccurate by error of mapping, navigation or cataloging. The information on this site is provided without any warranty, express or implied, and is for informational and historical purposes only.

Go Back to the previous page ... (Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge - Summary Page). 

Daytrip - Ireteba Peaks Wilderness Area

On 04/16/2019 five of us, Jim Herring, Bob Croke, Ron Ziance, Howard Saxon and myself drove our eeps to the Rockefeller Mine in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area east of searchlight. Even though today's weather predicted rain, it turned out pretty good. We spent about 4 hours driving along Rockefeller Road on our way to the Rockefeller Mine, making stops along the way for some scenic picture taking and exploration of some old abandoned mines. Click here for pictures and a description of this outing ... Ireteba Peaks Wilderness Area - 04/16/2019 Trip Notes.

Sunday

Daytrip - Magical Nipton California

Click to Enlarge
On 11 April 2019 we visited the rebranded town of Nipton California. Since American Green made an offer to buy this tiny town in hopes of creating the country’s first cannabis-friendly, energy-independent hospitality destination. It plans to spend $2.5 million over the next 18 months transforming Nipton into a town that includes hundreds of hotel rooms, mineral baths, a craft brewery, farm-to-table dining experiences, a cannabis farm, artist-in-residence programs, and plenty of marijuana-related businesses, such as cultivators and glassblowers. Click here for pictures and a description of the changes being made to this town ... Magical Nipton - 04/12/2019 Trip Notes.

Daytrip - Kingman Wash Road and Mine

Click to Enlarge
On 03/23/2019 Jim Herring and I decided to go looking for some wildflowers. A site I looked at said that there were some wildflowers off Kingman Wash Road in Arizona. There is also a unknown mine in the area, so we headed there. Even though the drive to the mine was a fairly rough trip, we enjoyed exploring around the mine sites. Click here for pictures and a description of the trip ... Kingman Wash Road & Mine.

Daytrip - Lower Lost Creek (Falls)

Click to Enlarge
On 03/07/2019 Bob Croke, Jim Herring, Harvey Smith and I decided to hike the trail leading to the Lost Creek Falls. After a picnic lunch at the Red Rock Overhand we decided to drive into the park and go to the Willow Canyon to hike the Lower Lost Creek Falls trail. Of the 3-4 times I have visited here in the past, it was the most water I've ever witnessed coming the falls. This was our 2nd hike of the day, but it was well worth the effort. Click here for pictures and a description of this hike ... Lower Lost Creek (Falls) - 03/07/2019 Trip Notes.

Daytrip - First Creek Canyon

Click to Enlarge
On 03/07/2019 Bob Croke, Jim Herring, Harvey Smith and I hiked First Creek Canyon trail in the RRCNCA. Due to the recent rains, we figured we might be able to get some good pictures of the waterfall there, and we were right. I was the best we have ever seen it. Our feet got a little wet crossing the fast running water in the wash, but it was certainly worth it. Click here for pictures and a description of this hike ... First Creek Canyon (RRCNCA) - 03/07/2019 Trip Notes.

Daytrip - Pictures of Snow and Visit to Little Red Rock

Click to Enlarge
On 02/22/2019 Jim Herring and I took a drive around the Red Rock Canyon National Recreation Are along Blue Diamond Road looking for some snow pictures. We also drove to the site of Little Red Rock to see how to get there. Here are links to both of the new pages with pictures and descriptions ... .

Tuesday

Daytrip - Fire Wave (VOF) and Desert Bighorn Sheep Sighting


Click to Enlarge
On 02/16/2019 Bob Croke, Cynthia Pace and myself drove to Valley of Fire for a guided hike of the Fire Wave. Even though we have each hiked this trail on more than one occasion in the past, this time we had a guided tour by Rosa Prasser, Park Interpreter for Nevada Division of State Parks, Valley of Fire State Park. In addition to this hike we had the unexpected siting of nearly 20 Desert Bighorn Sheep. Click here for pictures and descriptions for each page ...

Sunday

Daytrip - Lovell Summit Road and the SMNRA

Click to Enlarge
On 02/07/2019 Jim Herring, Bob Croke, Ron Ziance and I decided to take a ride up Lovell Canyon Road to Lovell Summit Road to drive in the snow and get some wintry snow pictures. As you can see from the pictures on this post, it was a beautiful sunny day without a cloud in the sky. As we neared the end of Lovell Canyon Road, the road became completely covered in snow. After turning onto Lovell Summit Road the snow got a little deeper. As we climbed up this snaking road to its summit, several of the sharp corners got a little slippery, however several places provided opportunities for some great views. Click here for pictures and a description of this trip ... Lovell Summit Road and the SMNRA.

Friday

Magical Nipton - 04/12/2019 Trip Notes

{Click on any image to view full size, then use the back button on your browser to return to this page}
This page last updated on 04/14/2019
(Fig. 01)
Town & Area Description: Nipton, California, now referred to as "Magical Niipton" (Fig. 01), is a little piece of unincorporated San Bernardino County, an hour south of Las Vegas via the I-15 and about two miles west of the Nevada state line, 21 miles from Searchlight on NV-163. Nearly a ghost town, this 80 acre aging outpost sits on the bottom of a prehistoric lake bed on the northern edge of the Mojave National Preserve. Scrub brush stretches out for miles to the rim of the long-forgotten lake. This valley is called Ivanpah, meaning sweet water in the Southern Paiute language. It is more of a pull-off on the side of the road than a town. Next to a railroad track there is a gravel parking lot next to the Nipton Trading Post, a general store that sells dry goods, refreshments, and guidebooks; the Whistle Stop CafĂ©; and the Nipton Hotel. Behind the hotel sits a handful of tented ecolodges and a half dozen tee-pees. About a dozen residents live across the road in their trailers. There is no stop sign, no postal service, no gas station, not even a sidewalk. The first thing you notice in Nipton is the silence. On a still day, you don’t hear anything. No cars, no voices, no birds, no airplanes, nothing. This absence of sound is why the Union Pacific freight train is so jarring when it passes through and it pierces the pristine silence. It is so loud that I heard that guests of the town’s various accommodations are handed earplugs upon check-in. To read about how the town of Nipton was born with a history of its owners and milestones achieved over the past 114 years, go to the following page ... Read More - History of Nipton California. But that is all about to change.
Side Note: Purchase of Nipton, California: In September of 2017, American Green, the largest publicly traded cannabis company in the United States, made an offer to buy this tiny town in hopes of creating the country’s first cannabis-friendly, energy-independent hospitality destination. To learn more about this purchase go to ... Read More - Purchase of Nipton CA
04/12/2019 Trip Notes: Though the purpose of our visit today was to locate the Lucy Gray Mine in the mountains northeast of the town, we spent nearly an hour walking around this re-energized town. Since I last visited Nipton nearly four years ago, a lot has happened. The company that made an offer to purchase Nipton has given the town a spit shine. Though the original worn sign still stands next to the cactus garden, it has been replaced with a new sign with dark wood and crisp white lettering (Fig. 01).

(Fig. 02)
One of the biggest changes so far is the Nipton Trading Post. The dusty convenience shop that once just sold crafts, lotto tickets, and sodas has been swept up and cleaned out. It is now being sold as more of a general store, than a trading post, and is spelled out in those large, wood-and-metal block letters popular in rustic-home decor sections. Candy, cleaning supplies, and toilet paper line the shelves, but small glass bongs and CBC oil are now sold near guidebooks about Mojave Desert snakes. In the back of the store, near a new seating area, hang T-shirts, tote bags, and hats imprinted with the newly branded Magical Nipton logo. Next to the seating area is a cannabis-dispensing vending machine waiting for the day it can be used in California. American Green created the biometric vending machine, which they call the American Green Machine. With the help of a smartphone app and a person’s fingerprint, the machine can verify the cannabis purchaser’s age and identification before dispensing the marijuana (Fig. 02).

(Fig. 03)
Originally constructed in 1910 and refurbished in 2004, the adobe hotel, built in the Spanish Territorial style with a wrap-around-covered porch (Fig. 02), is advertised as a ‘bed & breakfast’ and has five sleeping rooms, three with double beds and two with twin beds, all featuring central heating and cooling. There is a ‘lobby-like’ open reading and sitting room and two modern bathrooms are found just down the hall. Guest privileges include use of picnic areas, reflection pond, barbecue and food refrigeration facilities. They also again refurbished and renamed the hotel from Nipton Hotel to the California Hotel (Fig. 03).

(Fig. 04)


(Fig. 05)
They also refurbished and renamed the old El Oasis Cafe to the Whistle Stop Cafe & Saloon (Fig. 04). This rustic cafe offers either shaded outdoor seating areas or cozy, air conditioned inside seating (Fig. 05). Even though they don't yet have a menu available on the Internet, they do have a good limited menu with a variety of offerings.


(Fig. 06) Click to Enlarge

It serves up a limited menu of traditional homemade food such as chili, nachos, Cheese dogs, chicken fingers, etc., the ever popular "Nipton Burgers", salads, Add-ons, Sweets, Drinks, Draft and bottled beers.The cafe is open 7-days a week (Fig. 06).


(Fig. 07) Click to Enlarge
In addition to the refurbishment of the hotel, they have added more guest accommodations. They added eight tee-pees (Fig. 08) They come furnished and are solar powered (Fig. 07). There is a bathhouse in the camping area with regular toilets, hot water showers, electricity, etc.
(Fig. 08)
(Fig. 09)
Outside, scattered about the property there are available for viewing several vintage cars, but they aren’t your ordinary freshly painted autos. They must be seen to be appreciated.  Feature artists and cars include: a 1959 Lincoln Continental Mark III painted by Davia King, a 1949 Chevrolet Coupe painted by Gabe Gault, a 1964 Cadillac Fleetwood Limo painted by Kelcey Fisher, and a 1954 Plymouth Cranbrook painted by Kyle Boatwright. Though the conditions of these vary, they are certainly interesting (Fig. 09).

The grounds continue receiving a "clean up". Though the grounds are a "work-in-progress", it is slowly showing improvements. The old cactus garden has received a much needed reorganization. Next to the cactus garden is a colorful basket of vegetables (Fig. 10). It is obvious that things seem to be moving in the right direction. Finally, there is the large-scale outdoor art gallery that have found its way to Nipton. Currently there is a collection of 10 pieces from five different artists - several pieces coming directly from Burning Man. Peter Hazel, Nipton’s Art Curator, is the first of a handful of selected artists to display art in the Mojave Desert.

A huge, colorful ceramic octopus also greets you as you pull into town (Figs. 22 thru 24). Octavius, by Peter Hazel, was just recently on display at Burning Man. It is located next to the road behind the new sign announcing the town Magical Nipton (Fig. 01). In the front of the store parking lot, there is a large yellow Daffodil (also by Hazel) (Figs. 19 thru 21). It is one of the first things you see when pulling in. Daffodil was Peter’s first Burning Man art installation in 2014. His most recent sculpture “Bloom,” viewed by hundreds of thousands at Burning Man 2017 and 2018 (Fig. 11), is a beautiful piece embodying 2,000 recycled, colorful hand-blown glass. K2 engineering helped the team design the internal, interactive steel structure for the enormous jellyfish, which will be covered in 1,400 lineal feet of LEDS to create a beautiful glowing effect. It isn't quite finished and I look forward to seeing it all done. When completed it will be a 40-foot tall jellyfish covered in hand-made recycled glass. The colorful hand-blown glass is amazing. This is a 30-foot tower and will be a magnificent 42-foot tall Jelly Fish when completed (Figs. 12 & 13). Note: This project is currently being held up waiting for the San Bernardino County to approve a concrete pad to support the completed project.

Next is the “Perpetual Consumption”, a creation by Clayton Blake, an award-winning Australian contemporary artist who also recently exhibited at Burning Man. He utilizes metal shopping carts welded together and then erected to challenge and distort the viewer’s preconceptions of structures and space (Figs. 14 & 15). It is awesome and quite impressive.

Then there is “Transcendent Souls” from Nicole Ashton Martin of Truckee, another artist who presented at Burning Man 2018,. This is a structure of two massive hands emerging from the earth tenderly holding a vibrant heart with a swing set into between the sculpture’s wrists (Fig. 16). When examined carefully, one can find dozens of art cutouts woven around the supporting legs (Figs. 17 thru 19). There are additional pieces scattered about the property including the “Fly By”, a 1,800 lb Manta Ray, also by Peter Hazel, made of fused glass and steel that even lights up at night with colorful LEDs (Fig. 25). We definitely want to come back and see this!  (Notes continued below)

(Fig. 10)

(Fig. 11) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 12) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 13) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 14)
(Fig. 15) 
(Fig. 16)

(Fig. 17) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 18) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 19) Click to Enlarge

(Fig. 19) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 20) Click to Enlarge

(Fig. 21) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 22) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 23) Click to Enlarge
(Fig. 24) Click to Enlarge
Notes Continued: When viewed collectively, Nipton's art adds culture throughout the town, while providing guests and visitors with introspection as well as interactive activities. With a focus on becoming the largest outdoor art gallery in the world, Magical Nipton has expectations of growing the collection to as many as 25 pieces, complete with private, friendly walking trails and observation areas. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be anyone around that is able to answer questions about the town's plans or ongoing projects that seem to be in various stages of completion. On this visit, after touring the town, we attempted to locate the Lucy Gray Mine. Unfortunately, our search for the mine turned out to be a bust. We got lost in the large wash on the way to the mine, and even nearly got stuck in the soft rocks and sand of the wash. The only thing we ended up with was a few pictures of some desert cactus and wildflowers we passed along the way (Figs. 26 thru 29).

(Fig. 25)


(Fig. 26) In the background, the Ivanpah Solar Plant is the largest solar thermal power plant in the world. 

(Fig. 27)
(Fig. 28)
(Fig. 29)

___________________________________________________

Note: Every attempt is made to provide accurate information, but occasionally depictions are inaccurate by error of mapping, navigation or cataloging. The information on this site is provided without any warranty, express or implied, and is for informational and historical purposes only.

Go Back to the previous page ... (Nipton California - Summary Page).