Friday

Daytrip – Davis Dam and the Colorado River Heritage Park & Trails

EP-P1050604This weeks hiking destination with the rock-hounds from the Henderson Heritage Park’s Senior Facility. was the Davis Dam and the Colorado River Heritage Greenway Park and Trails system in Laughlin, Nevada. Pictures and information from this trip are divided between two separate blog pages. Click the following links to view … the Colorado River Heritage Park & Trails and the Davis Dam.

Index for Category - Desert Landscapes/Panoramas

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2013 Desert Landscapes

2013 Desert Landscapes

           
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Image Title Bar 09 Gilbraltar Rock

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Image Title Bar 10 Carpenter I Fire

Fire Wave
Image Title Bar 11 Fire Wave
                             

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Image Title Bar 32 Valley of Fire 01

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Image Title Bar 32 Valley of Fire 02

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Image Title Bar 32 Valley of Fire 03

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Image Title Bar 39 Liberty Bell Arch

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Image Title Bar 53 Fig 01-08 Redstone Loop Trail

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Image Title Bar 64 Fig 01-09 Rainbow Vista Foothills

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Image Title Bar 124 Fig 01-11 Kodachrome Rd

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Image Title Bar 125 Fig 01-12 Bitter Spring Rd

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Image Title Bar 126 Fig 01-13 Bitter Spring Rd

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Image Title Bar 127 Fig 01-14 Corn Creek

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Image Title Bar 129 Fig 01-14 The Fire Wave

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Image Title Bar 130 Fig 01-15 Logandale Trails

Sunday

Daytrip – Valley of Fire

EP-P1050519On this trip to the Valley of Fire State Park with the Rock-hounds from the Henderson Senior Facility, I hit two spots that I had been to before; a place called The Cabins and a hike to a location called, The Top of the World Arch Hike. While five of us tried to find the trail to the Top of the World Arch, the remainder of the group hiked various locations including the Fire Wave and Mouse’s Tank. Before leaving the park for our journey home, we all enjoyed lunch in the picnic area next to The Cabins. Click here to go to see pictures from this and previous visits … Valley of Fire State Park.

Tuesday

Year In Review: This category contains summary pages showcasing my favorite hiking photos over the past three years. Though each of these hand-picked pictures can be found throughout my Photo Gallery, I wanted a place where I could provide viewers with a quick "glimpse" of what they might find if they spent time pursuing the various subject categories available by selecting the "Photos by Subject" tab or either of the "Daytrips" or "RoadTrips" tabs.

Sunday

The Great Beatty Mudmound Fossils

         {Click on an image to enlarge, then use the back button to return to this page}
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The Great Beatty Mudmound: This bioherm was first recognized in 1960 by geologists H.R. Cornwell and F.G. Kleinhampl during their geological mapping of the region. This pod-shaped accumulation of calcium carbonate is some 270 feet thick and more than 1,000 feet in length as it protrudes from the west side of a mountain above Secret Pass just south of Meiklejohn Peak, elevation 5,940 feet. To gain a better appreciation of the mudmound's dimensions, one must hike up a steep canyon wash and stand near the base of it. From this up-close-and-personal vantage point, this uncommon geological structure is a massive, pale gray body of limestone exposed along the skyline of the mountains, that truly dominates the view. It was much bigger than we expected. Written reports on the Internet indicate that the core of this formation contains a wealth of excellently preserved invertebrate animal remains some 480 million years old, including echinoderms, sponges, bryozoans, ostracodes (tiny bivalve crustaceans related to barnacles), pelecypods, gastropods, trilobites, conodonts, cephalopods and brachiopods. The specimens are restricted to sporadic, productive pockets within the core of the mudmound and to, more abundantly, the medium gray to olive-gray and olive-brown shaley limestones along its flanks and directly above the mudmound itself. other calcium carbonate layers contain prolific quantities of brachiopods, most of which are rather tiny.
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2013 Lakes, Rivers & Desert Water

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Image Title Bar 07 Lake Harriet


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Image Title Bar 24 Rainbow Springs Rd

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Image Title Bar 25 Rainbow Springs


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Image Title Bar 35 Mummy Spring

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Image Title Bar 54 Fig 09-05 Bitter Spring

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Image Title Bar 55 Fig 09-06 Lake Harriet


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Image Title Bar 60 Fig 09-07 Amargosa River

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Image Title Bar 72 Fig 09-08 33-Hole Overlook

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Image Title Bar 74 Fig 09-09 Calico Tanks

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Image Title Bar 106 Fig 09-10 Wilson Canyon

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Image Title Bar 107 Fig 09-11 Tahoe Keys Marina

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Image Title Bar 109 Fig 09-12 Lilly Pond

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Image Title Bar 108 Fig 09-13 Secret Harbor 

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Image Title Bar 110 Fig 09-14 Emerald Bay