Saturday

PDF Roadtrips Added

This week I worked on a project that has been on my to-do list for more than a year – transferring posts of roadtrips from my old “travelogue” site. This was something I have been wanting to do ever since I designed this site. Several years ago I used to create posts using PDF files to share trips instead of the more detailed picture posts that I now use. Even though I still have a few left to convert, this process is nearly complete. Here is a list of the pages that I added that can now be accessed under the Roadtrips tab located at the top of each page.

ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Pyramid Lake - Nixon, NV
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Albuquerque, NM - 2009 Balloon Festival
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Grand Staircase - Scenic Rt 12, UT
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Silverton, Colorado
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Monument Valley Nnavajo Tribal Park, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Antelope Canyon - Page, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Sedona, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Oatman, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - London Bridge - Lake Havasu, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Kingman, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Petrified Forest National Park, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Grand Canyon Railway - Williams, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Grand Canyon National Park, AZ - South Rim
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Grand Canyon National Park - North Rim, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Wupatki National Park, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Arboretum at Flagstaff, AZ
ROADTRIP - Roadtrip - Walnut Canyon National Park, AZ

Wednesday

Arrow Canyon Wilderness Area

E-P1040129On 01/22/2013 Harvey Smith and I set out for Moapa, NV and a hike in Arrow Canyon. Arrow Canyon boarders the north side of the 27,530 acre Arrow Canyon Wilderness Area. This canyon, is confined by sheer cliffs that are so tall and close together that sunlight rarely reaches the bottom. The canyon, 18 feet across at its narrowest point and up to 300 feet deep in some places runs for nearly 3 miles before ending at a 40-foot high dam. Click here to view pictures read about this hike … Arrow Canyon Hike.

My Northern Desert Iguana

E-P1010344Several months ago I came upon a desert iguana while hiking the Riverwalk Exploration Trail inside the Colorado River Heritage Greenway Park in Laughlin, Nevada. When I first approached him, he was sunning himself on the cement walkway at the beginning of the trail. Eventually, I got him to move off the walkway and onto the desert sand for a more natural background. This was the first time I had ever seen one of these and was not only amazed by his beautiful markings, but by his size as well. At nearly a foot long, it was the largest lizard I have seen so far in all my hiking. Click here for more pictures and to read up on this amazing creature … Northern Desert Iguana.

Tuesday

Bee Pictures

SippingWhile performing some year-end clean-up and reviews, I recently came across several flower pictures that I captured over the past couple of years that showed some “bees” sipping nectar. Even though I’m sure that I probably have them displayed individually in the hiking post in which they were taken, I decided to gather them together and create a single post titled, Bee Mania. Check it out here … Bee Mania

Friday

2012 - Year In Review

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I have spent the last couple of days putting together what will be my last post for the year 2012. I created this post to act as a central depository to showcase what I feel were some of the better and/or more interesting photos captured on my various hikes over the past 12 months. Click here to view … 2012 Year In Review

Valley of Fire Updates

E-P1040008On New Year’s day my friend Harvey Smith and I drove to Valley of Fire for two guided hikes; one to the Fire Wave and one labeled as the “Top of the World Hike” along White Domes Road. This was actually my second visit to the Fire Wave, but got to hike more of the surrounding area on this hike. For the second hike we arrived early at the designated trailhead location and decided to try the hike on our own. Unfortunately we headed out on what we thought was the trail only to discover that it did not lead us to the top of the ridge-line that we had selected. In spite of this, we still had a very nice 2-1/2 hour hike through some gorgeous desert, dry washes and narrow ravines that led to the base of the mountains. Click here and scroll down to the 01/01/2013 Trip Notes section to view these recent updates … Valley of Fire State Park.

Tuesday

The Ancient One

       {Click on an image to enlarge, then use the back button to return to this page}
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I-15 (South) Towards Jean, Goodsprings and Sandy Valley:

3-IndexMAP - I-15 Towards Jean-2
(Fig. 01) Click to Enlarge
This area is filled with nearly 75 mines that all belonged to the Goodsprings Mining District, seen by the green shaded area in (Fig. 01). The area is split by Sandy Valley Road which runs from Goodsprings, west to the town of Sandy Valley. Unfortunately, once you leave the main roads, there are relatively few areas to explore that don't require a 4WD vehicle. Even though the scale of the map in (Fig. 01) is not detailed enough to pinpoint the many mines found in the areas noted below, you will find detailed location maps on each of the linked pages. Clicking the titles below for more photos and detailed descriptions.  
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EP-P1000743Goodsprings: Generally, the term 'ghost town' is associated with a boom-town of the American West that, because the economic activity that once supported it has ceased to prosper, has become deserted or abandoned, yet still contains visible remains of what it once was. Once a thriving mining town and the recognized center of the Goodsprings Mining District, with a peak population of nearly 1,000 inhabitants, it now has a population of less than 230 residents. With only a handful of reminders that hearken back to its "glory" days, many falling into further decay with each passing year, Goodsprings can be truly classified as a modern day ghost town. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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HM102-plaqueGoodsprings Mining District: Generally speaking, the Goodsprings district is located west, north and south around the town of Goodsprings, covering an area of approximately 100 square miles. With over 75 mines and several hundred prospects in the southern end of the Spring Mountain Range in the south western part of Clark County, Nevada, it was the largest mining district in the state.
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EP-P1030465Goodsprings Mining District (South). This portion of the Goodsprings Mining District, located at the southern end of the Spring Mountain Range, south of Goodsprings along the west side of NV-161, is filled with dozens of prospects, mines, shafts and adits, many of which are 400 to 500 feet up on steep mountain sides. Due to the difficulty in reaching some of these locations, many of them still have remains and equipment that hasn’t been picked clean. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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YellowPineMillYellow Pine Mines: In 1901, the Yellow Pine Mining Company was formed, which consolidated ownership of most of the area mines and built a mill in Goodsprings. Because of this large consolidation, this general area was often referred to as the Yellow Pine Mining District, however, it was just a area within the Goodsprings Mining District. In 1911 the company built a rail line to Jean to reduce the costs of shipping out the ore from its mines and mill. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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EP-P1030388Rainbow Quarry & Aztec Tank: About seven miles north of town on the Goodsprings Bypass Road you bear left onto Potosi Mountain Road and travel about a half mile and bear right onto Pauline Mine Road. Traveling along the base of the large red sandstone outcrop this road takes you to the the Aztec Tank, Contact Mine, and Pauline Mine and an active sandstone quarry. At an elevation of around 5,000 feet, the drive across the desert here provides colorful scenery and great views of the Potosi Range. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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EP-P1030349Mount Potosi: At 8,515 feet, Mount Potosi is a notable peak in the Spring Mountains located about 14 miles behind the town of Goodsprings. Besides being the home of 7 full power FM broadcasting stations it is most notably known for being the crash site that killed actress Carole Lombard and 22 others on January 16, 1942. Its summit is easily reachable from service road that runs along its ridges from the southern portion of the range, making it an easy option for a hike. The entire length of this road offers stupendous views in every direction. Hiking, Rock-hounding, Birding and Photography
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E-P1100161Sandy Valley Road - Nevada: There are literally dozens of old mine sites, shafts and adits located along this 10-mile road, many reachable by less than an hours hike. The ore deposits for this area fall into two primary classifications; gold-copper and lead-zinc. Clicking this link will take you to a page with nearly a half-dozen links to mine hikes in this area. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography

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E-P1100211-2Sloan Canyon Petroglyph Site: The 48,438 acre Sloan Canyon National Conservation Area is located only a short distance south of Las Vegas and Henderson, Nevada in the northwestern portion of the McCullough Mountain Range. It surrounds an additional area that has been designated as the North McCullough Wilderness Area. The centerpiece of this area is the Sloan Canyon Petroglyph Site, one of the most significant cultural resources in Southern Nevada. Its 318 recorded rock art panels contain more than 1,200 individual petroglyphs. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography

NV 167 – Lake Mead Northshore Road (LMNRA)

7-IndexMAP - NV-167 Northshore Drive-2
(Fig. 01) Click to Enlarge
Daytrips Bordering Lake Mead's Northshore Road and the Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA): As you can tell from the map in (Fig. 01) the Northshore Road does not offer anywhere near the number of views of Lake Mead as the south shore drive, however, it provides unbelievable views of exposed rainbow-colored layers of rock in every direction. There are literally dozens of excellent hiking and birding opportunities along Lake Mead’s Northshore Road (NV 167), located on the north-western side the vast 1,495,665 acre Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA). The locations noted below range from short stops of between 1/2 to one hour, up to all-day hikes. By combining some of these into a single daytrip, one can make several drives here without ever having to repeat any stops. Click on the titles below for more pictures and full descriptions of each area.

E-P1010945Lower Las Vegas Wash. Las Vegas Wash is a 12-mile plus tributary that channels more than 150 million gallons a day of storm water, urban runoff, shallow groundwater and highly-treated wastewater through various valley wetlands and into the Las Vegas Bay at Lake Mead.  Near its terminus at Las Vegas Bay, the wash is called the Lower Las Vegas Wash as it passes under the man made Lake Las Vegas through two 7 foot pipes and under NV-167 on its way to Lake Mead. Hiking, Rock-hounding and PhotographyParagraph divider
E-P1090843-P1090844Lava Butte & Rainbow Gardens. Composed of Dacite, an igneous volcanic rock, Lava Butte is part of a geologic wonder called Frenchman’s block that may have been a volcanic dome formed over 13 million years ago.The dark outer coating on these iron oxide rocks is desert varnish. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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EFP-P1000258Gypsum Cave: Located in Sunrise Mountain, less than 20 miles northeast of Las Vegas, Gypsum Cave is a six-room limestone cave that is considered to be among the oldest aboriginal sites in North America. The cave measures 300 feet long (deep) by 120 feet wide. Its rooms are filled with dry, dusty deposits. Gypsum Cave is significant because it has yielded artifacts related to early human occupation and information about the region's ancient ecosystem. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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E-P1110105-P1110109Bowl of Fire. The Bowl of Fire lies within the 48,000-acre Muddy Mountains Wilderness Area on the west side of NV-167. This is an area of brilliant-red Jurassic-Age sandstone outcrops surrounded by gray limestone mountains. The dark pink sandstone is most common and generally forms the uppermost parts of the region, though there is a line of red cliffs that rises higher to the northeast. These outcrops are separated by open land of sand dunes and dry washes, some of which are lined by patches of very nice, smooth, banded sandstone. A geologic wonder. Hiking, Rock-hounding and Photography
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EP-P1040469Northshore Summit Trail: To find this location begin looking for hiking and photography signs just past the 20-mile marker while driving north on Northshore Road. At 20.5 miles, the parking area for this trail is on the left side of the road. The round-trip loop trail climbs 200-feet from the parking area to the top of a distant bluff and offers a small taste of the many beautiful geologic wonders of this region. This trail is too short by itself to constitute a daytrip, however, combined with other stops such as the Redstone Loop Trail/Picnic area and Rogers Spring, etc, it can still make for a nice daily outing. Hiking and Photography
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E-P1100536Redstone Loop Trail. This is a scenic area where the bright red sandstone outcrops contrast with the gray limestone mountains. This is short 1.6 mile walk is a loop that surrounds several red sandstone outcroppings and ends up back at the trailhead. Because this trail is so short, it really doesn’t warrant a trip by itself, however is a great place for a picnic stop to or from a longer hike. Hiking and Photography
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E-IMG_1512Rogers Spring. Rogers Spring is a hot spring which is caused by geothermal activity deep within the ground at the base of the hills. This super heated water comes up and then forms several pools within the area of Rogers Spring that eventually flow into Lake Mead.There are many unusual fish and turtles that live in the pond. Though there is a small trail that leads up the hill behind the spring, this is another of those places that really doesn’t warrant a trip by itself, however is a great place for a picnic stop to or from a longer hike. Hiking and PhotographyParagraph divider
E-P1090054Lovell Wash and the Anniversary Mine/Narrows. Lovell Wash, a tributary of Callville Wash, cuts into a ridge in the Gale Hills at the south edge of the Muddy Mountains. This area, once home to a borax mining operation, provides some very interesting geology, ancient petroglyphs, Mojave desert flora and one of Nevada’s best slot canyons. This land was laid down as sheets of mud in the bottom of some vast playa lake where ancient animals once roamed. The mud turned to stone, and tectonic activity jumbled the area and turned the lake bed on edge. You can see several mountain-sized ridges of sedimentary materials (sandstone, limestone, and mudstone of various colors including purple, red, green, yellow, and gray) that have been steeply tilted up; some nearly vertically. Hiking, Rock-hounding and PhotographyParagraph divider
E-P1100611Valley of Fire State Park. Valley of Fire is Nevada's oldest and largest state park, comprising more than 46,000 acres. The valley derives its name from the many red sandstone monoliths and formations found throughout the park. There are several sites within the park that contain many fine examples of 3,000 year-old rock art (petroglyphs) left by the ancient peoples that once roamed the area. Ancient trees are represented throughout the park in the form of petrified wood. The 10.5 mile Valley of Fire Road that runs through the park was designated as a Nevada Scenic Byway on June 30, 1995. Hiking and PhotographyParagraph divider
E-P1090116-P1090117Callville Bay. Callville was originally established in 1864 by the Mormons as a steamboat port on the Colorado River. There was a large warehouse, a landing, a post office and a corral. In October of 1866 the steamboat Esmeralda delivered 100 tons of freight. However, after the transcontinental railroad was completed in northern Nevada in 1869, its use as a supply route via the Colorado was eventually abandoned.  Today, with over 860 boat slips, Callville Bay Marina is not only the largest on Lake Mead, it is the largest inland marina in the U.S. Unfortunately, our present eight-year drought has caused lake levels to recede to the point that the boat bay is struggling. Hiking and Photography

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E-P1090347St Thomas, Nevada. St. Thomas, Nevada, is a ghost town in Clark County, Nevada, located in Mopa Valley near where the Muddy River flows into the Colorado River. St. Thomas was purchased by the US Federal Government and was finally abandoned as the waters of Lake Mead submerged the town. It is now located within the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Due to a 10 year drought that has lowered the water level in Lake Mead by as much as 80 feet, the towns remaining foundations, walls, and grated cisterns and numerous alkali-crusted trails branching in all directions lie exposed and ready for exploration. The ruins of St. Thomas are protected by the National Park Service as a historic site. Hiking and PhotographyParagraph divider

E-P1110034Lost City Museum. The Lost City Museum is located in Overton, Nevada and operated as one of the six Nevada State Museums by the Nevada Department of Cultural Affairs. It was built by the National Park Service in 1935 and houses an extensive collection of Virgin Anasazi artifacts from Pueblo Grande de Nevada. The museum was on the ruin of an actual Virgin Anasazi pueblo and offers a reconstructed Anasazi building that is open to visitors. A later extension was actually built on top of some ruins in order to protect them.  It was established as a place to move the artifacts from Pueblo Grande de Nevada which was going to be partially covered by the waters of Lake Mead as a result of building the Hoover Dam. Once the dam was finished, about five miles of sites had been inundated or undercut by the water. Photography

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EP-P1040934Logandale Trails Recreation Area. (LTRA) is the grouping of more than 200 miles of recreational trails, suitable for a variety of OHV types, as well as hiking and horseback riding, in the spectacular landscape that exists between the township of Logandale and Valley of Fire State Park. It is located between the Overton Ridge and the Weiser Ridge in the north Muddy Mountains. Its southern boundary is the Overton Wash, just north of the Valley of Fire State Park. OHV Riding, Hiking, Biking, Horseback Riding and Photography
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